How Sublimatiob Calender Heat Transfer Machine Works on Sublimation Paper?

Sublimation tacky papers are designed for use with roll type heat presses. The paper incorporates a thermal adhesive that sticks the fabric to the paper. This prevents the paper from lifting up or moving when the press is opened, thus avoiding an undesirable blurring or doubling of the images known as “ghosting”. 
Image result for sublimation calender
Typical settings when performing sublimation for textile are approximately 400 deg F, with a dwell time of about 40-45 seconds and most polyesters handle this high heat without problems. Some specialized materials can yellow, loose their elasticity or melt at 400 deg, so in these cases the temperature can be lowered and the dwell time increased, however it should be noted that sublimation doesn’t occur properly as temps drop below 320 deg F. During sublimation the paper must be held tightly under pressure against the fabric to ensure sharp transfers.
 
Image result for sublimation calender
 
Looking like something you might expect to see in an industrial laundry, Roll-type Calendars are large, made from a lot of heavy-duty metal and usually more expensive than Flatbeds. They are however generally faster than flatbed presses, require less operator attendance and are the only option if you intend to produce rolled goods.
 
Paper and fabric are fed together (often on a roll) into the unit and a heat resistant belt holds the fabric tightly against the rotating drum. The fabric and paper exit out the other side of the drum where they separate and are wound up on their own individual take-up spools - See diagram below: