Room-Temperature & Humidity Fastness for Sublimation Paper Transfer

Room-Temperature Thermal Degradation Or "Dark Fade"
This factor is the relatively slow thermal degradation of colorants and paper that occurs even at room temperature. Historically called "dark fade" because traditional silver-halide photos could change significantly even when stored in the dark, this factor also applies to displayed photos. The accelerated test requires long-term tests of more than a year at several elevated temperatures (e.g., 55ÞC-70ÞC). The results are then extrapolated to a room temperature (e.g., 25ÞC) prediction. 
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Fortunately, ink jet colorants (dye and pigment) are very stable and typically can last 100+ years at room temperature, so dark fade is usually not a limiting permanence factor for ink jet photo prints as long as high-quality sublimation transfer paper is used. Thermal degradation was historically a significant issue for traditional color silver-halide photos due to residual chemicals from the development process. Wilhelm-Research.com has published a variety of thermal degradation data for ink jet and silver-halide photos. Dye sublimation photos cannot withstand the elevated temperatures required by the accelerated test, so long-term longevity is unknown at this time for dye sublimation prints.
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Humidity Fastness
Significant exposure to relative humidity higher than about 80 percent can cause colorants to migrate, thereby causing color changes or loss of sharpness. Long exposure to very high humidity can cause microbial growth and discoloration. Test labs can expose prints to elevated humidity for a period of weeks to qualitatively rank the relative humidity fastness of different products based on measured color changes. As with light fade, humidity fastness is typically improved by using the manufacturer's branded paper that is matched to that particular brand of sublimation ink.
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